Fieldkeeping

Every winter when the field gets too wet for riding I have to put all the jumps and dressage markers away.  Inevitably, I’m not very good at doing that and so they often don’t get put away until it is basically time to get them out again.  Even then, they would probably just stay where they were if it were not for the fact that the field needs harrowing and that’s a lot easier if there are no jumps in the way.

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That time had finally come so the dog and I spent a very hot afternoon lugging poles across the field.  At least, I carried them – the dog just jumped over them.

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It seems only a few weeks ago that we were knee deep in mud but the dry weather we have had since lockdown started means that the fields are now bone dry and the harrow kicked up a huge cloud of dust.  I only did a tiny bit of the field but my Dad – who did most of the work – had to wear a mask for the worst parts.

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It was warm work but the field looks so much better for it now.

A Harrowing Time

Over the winter our fields can get quite cut up which means that once the ground starts to dry out we are left with all sorts of lumps and bumps the ponies (and I!) can trip over.  It can make schooling rather difficult as we aren’t confident enough to go forward properly.  We haven’t jumped at all this year yet because the idea of tripping as we do is not pleasant.

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However, we finally managed to get the fields harrowed.  The fields are looking a lot better already and once the grass gets growing properly they should start looking lovely again.

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I schooled this morning and it definitely felt a nicer surface to ride on.  We didn’t trip once and I wasn’t at all worried about working Galahad properly.  Now I should finally be able to use the lovely jumps I got for my birthday.  I can’t wait!

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